The Spiritual Scientist

Post Image

The Monk's Podcast 43 with Braja Bihari Prabhu - How to disagree without being disagreeable - The Spiritual Scientist

Podcast http://www.thespiritualscientist.com/audio/ccd%20classes/desiretree/2020%20classes/07-20%20classes/The%20Monk%27s%20Podcast%2043%20with%20Braja%20Bihari%20Prabhu%20-%20How%20to%20disagree%20without%20being%20disagreeable.mp3 Video: Transcription : The Monks podcast with Braja Bihari Prabhu- How to disagree without being disagreeable Summary of the podcast @1.34.07: Chaitanya Charan Prabhu: We discussed about this topic on how to disagree without being disagreeable. You started with your journey of how you started exploring conflict resolution, and then you created structures which are across the world now. Devotees can access these in various ways, i.e. the website. And then we discussed whether devotees have more conflicts or less than others? So, there were some common factors: 1. Information 2. Relationships 3. Structures and values. But beyond that, it is our own identity. Our investment in our identity that can cause conflicts, especially in religion faith-based organizations like ours. I think that and values were the main part of our remaining discussion. So, it is amazing, you quoted Prabhupada saying that we should appreciate people even who are not devotees and then what to speak of devotees. And that appreciation or that broad-mindedness, it can come if we learn to see others as devotees, not just see them and reduce them to the position that is problematic for us. You also talk about “I” messages, which is more about expressing vulnerability rather than expressing judgment about the other person. If we focus on the fact that we all have the same ultimate purpose, then we can minimize differences. Sometimes, because we emphasize philosophy, so, we reduce people to philosophical categories, seeing them as multifaceted beings. Prabhupada has given many examples of him being philosophical, by having differences, but being culturally friendly. Then you also made this point that the resolution can be based on three ways: 1. Power- based, 2. Rights- based 3. Interest- based Most resolutions are power- based. So, when a call for cooperation seems to be like a deference to authority, that’s not necessarily a bad thing, if it is operational. We talked also a little bit about social media and how it can unnecessarily spread negative vibrations. But there is a means by which devotees can express their grievances and have things addressed. And toward the end, we talked about how we have created space for devotees by provisions like; different devotees can have different outreach centres in the same city. So that means we appreciate each other but we try to have space for ourselves. And in that way, we can have unity in diversity like a like a set of flowers in a flower vase. So, this was a very illuminating discussion. Any concluding words you want to say? Braja Bihari Prabhu: “No, but just what you just did summarize is one of the best ways to have a good rapport with other devotees. Because it shows that you were respectful enough to listen. And when you summarize like that, it’s also if you’re having a dialogue or you know debate, it’s great to summarize the other person’s points before you make your own because the person will feel much more ‘Oh yes, he’s understood me’. “ Chaitanya Charan Prabhu: “Okay”. Braja Bihari Prabhu: So, it’s very [...]

Post Image

The Monk's Podcast 55 with Garuda Prabhu - Does love exist in the material world? - The Spiritual Scientist

Podcast Video: Transcription : Does love exist in the material world- The Monks Podcast with HG Garuda Prabhu Transcript of the various topics perfectly summarised by Chaitanya Charan Prabhu from @1.47.38: So, we discussed today if there’s love in the material world, and I shared my experience of my parents’ love. And you said that in one sense it’s obvious that this is love. But why is there this understanding there’s no love? Because of the nature of Prabhupada’s discourse and our understanding of Prabhupada. So Prabhupada had a dramatic way of presenting things where sometimes he made one statement where he was quite extreme, but then he would make another statement. Then I think this “kanistha madhyama uttama; this is the most distinctive thing which stands out in our conversation. So, the kanistha mode is just taking one statement and absolutizing it. But the madhyama is more inductive; trying to make sense of various statements one by one. But deductive is understanding the whole purpose. And then he said “a most natural form of intuition”; where you see the part in the context of the whole; and that was profound! Then you discussed where there is no love in the world. So, those kinds of statements are primarily delivered in a particular context. As devotees, Prabhupada also said in The Nectar of Devotion, that there is nobody who can live without loving. So, we discussed further also how in Prabhupada’s statements, sometimes he talked about how condemning people is Kanistha mentality; trying to understanding people is Madhyama mentality and trying to see how these people are already connected with Krishna and connecting them further, that is Uttama mentality. So that was beautiful again. Another striking point discussed was that of thin, finely veiled form of lust. So, in the name of love and conforming to standards there, somebody might be exercising it. So, somebody might say “I am protecting you from lust”, like an authority might be saying that to a subordinate, “I am protecting you from lust”, but they might themselves be in lust. So, lust means basically wanting to control others. Or rather you put it that when “our need for the other person is more than our caring for that person”. So “I need you to maintain my image and I am such a great trainer of devotees and then you are spoiling my image then and that will not work”. Then you talked about humility and passion; you mentioned that humility means to accept people where they are at, and passion means that we want to help them and one way we help them is to help them grow to elevate to come to the standard. Then another striking point in that connection was that, when we try to help, when we think we are helping people, we may end up hurting them. You talked about being: 1. Narrow minded 2. Open minded 3. Broad minded That was also beautiful. So many devotees may get hurt if the authorities are in a narrow-minded phase, narrow [...]

Post Image

The Monk's Podcast 51 with Bhanu Maharaj - Why science and scripture see reality differently - The Spiritual Scientist

Podcast http://www.thespiritualscientist.com/audio/ccd%20classes/desiretree/2020%20classes/08-20%20classes/The%20Monk%27s%20Podcast%2051%20with%20Bhanu%20Maharaj%20-%20Why%20science%20and%20scripture%20see%20reality%20differently.mp3 Video: Transcription : The Monk’s podcast – Why science and scripture see reality differently with HH Bhanu Swami Maharaj. Chaitanya Charan Prabhu succinct from 1.19.44: “So, we tried to discuss our left brain, right brain approaches to Scripture. And then you started by how this brain researcher, she had a different way of looking after a stroke. So, that’s one scientific way of saying that, you know, the science way of looking at reality is not the only way. Another layers of chances are through all paranormal research, where there is various kinds of research done in Stanford and other places. We could say that our Bhagavatam cosmology is also another way of looking at reality. And within science itself, there are different ways. There is quantum physics which sees reality very differently from Newtonian physics. So, if within science itself, there are different ways of looking at reality, then there could be some ways which are outside science also. And scripture offers us that view. Sukadev Goswami is himself a yogi, so he’s giving a vision of the universe that is meant to increase appreciation for the Lord; that how the Lord accommodates various living beings at various levels. And from that purpose, that is way the 5th fifth Canto cosmology is described. Even in our tradition, they have been comfortable with different ways of looking at the universe. The scientists like Aryabhatta, Bhaskaracharya, they were both Brahmins, so they accepted the Puranas, and they also accepted Jyotish Shastras. Then there is the question that, how much of this is depictable? It’s very difficult to depict because it’s more in terms of visuals or images. Some depictions can be done. But we don’t have to literally insist that this is the way it is. And certainly, we don’t have to think that the scientific way is wrong. The Bhagavatam’s description can be both symbolic and real, or metaphorical and metaphysical – both. Then you talked about the pendulum; say one way is that to say that science is wrong; and the other is to say scripture is imaginary. But the balanced way would be to say that science has one way of looking and the scripture has another way of looking. And then with respect to tradition- if it’s traditional, it needn’t be made into a major faith issue that if you can’t accept this, then you are a heretic, but rather accept the principles accept the principles. You can put aside the other details if you can’t accept them. There are ways in which the conflicts and the details can be resolved. And you talked about how religion without realization becomes fanatical. The “Bhaavgrahi and Saragrahi”. So, the Sahagrahi means to focus on gaining the realisation and to encourage people to take up the process by which they can get the realization and not put in unnecessary obstacles. So, we can have a compartmentalization that science has a jurisdiction for empirical knowledge, and scripture talks about transcendental matters. When scripture gives us a view [...]

Post Image

The Monk's Podcast 62 with Madhavananda Prabhu - Conspiracy theories - The Spiritual Scientist

Podcast http://www.thespiritualscientist.com/audio/ccd%20classes/desiretree/2020%20classes/09-20%20classes/The%20Monk%27s%20Podcast%2062%20with%20Madhavananda%20Prabhu%20-%20Conspiracy%20theories.mp3 Video: Transcription : Conspiracy theories – The Monk’s Podcast with Madhavananda Prabhu Succinctly summarised by Chaitanya Charan Prabhu from 1.30.59: So, we discussed today broadly on the topic of going beyond conspiracy theories. We may blame people individually when we face problems, either our own problems or problems in the society around us. When we expand that blaming mentality, we might blame someone, a particular agent, one particular cause, and that can become a conspiracy theory. And so, the problem with that is, first of all, you know, we don’t know enough to say that one particular thing is the cause of all problems. And it’s more likely that the problem is more like ignorance or incompetence rather than malevolence. And even if it is, that there is some one cause of all problems, now, what are we going to do about it? Whether it is somebody spreading and spreading biochemical by doing biochemical warfare through pathogens or somebody trying to convert a whole country, how is it if we become more obsessed with evil, then focusing on godliness, then we will end up becoming agents of evil. You mentioned two quotes of Bhakti Siddhanta Thakur about reformation, that criticizing others is actually very difficult work. And a Guru must do that. He says, I’m forced to do that. But why are you going out of your way to do that? So, criticizing could also mean obsessing over the evil and other people. And that’s why we might criticize and that can bring out the evil within us. So, the real problem with conspiracy theories is that we become more conscious of the problem than of Krishna as the solution, which can distract us from Krishna consciousness. Krishna consciousness is the primary solution and as the tool within that, there could be various things. There could be some managerial change, there could be some change in power, there could be bringing awareness of some problems, various things, but then there is a conspiracy theory mentality. The second thing that is too first becomes the primary and Krishna consciousness is like pushed or retired upstairs, and then then we end up often being a part of the problem rather than the solution. In essence, reformation is required, but to think that we are the reformers, that is a problem. And then you talk about how we focus more on the domain of ideas. So, at the transcendental level, we need to know that it is Krishna who is the solution. If we are part of the solution, it is because Krishna is acting through us and we need to stay connected with Krishna. So, there is more of a positive focus in trying to solve the problem, rather than criticizing things. Like Prabhupada did not criticize Gaudiya Matha so much as he focused on creating an alternative in the form of the Krishna consciousness movement. And the problem with the conspiracy theories is that it creates a culture of distrust and we can question authority. But it is [...]

Post Image

The Monk's Podcast 65 with Govinda Prabhu - Centralization, Decentralization and Dharma - The Spiritual Scientist

Podcast http://www.thespiritualscientist.com/audio/ccd%20classes/desiretree/2020%20classes/09-20%20classes/The%20Monk%27s%20Podcast%2065%20with%20Govinda%20Prabhu%20-%20Centralization%2C%20Decentralization%20and%20Dharma.mp3 Video: Transcription : Centralization, Decentralization and Dharma – The Monk’s Podcast with Govinda Prabhu Summary from 2.00.08: We were talking about how democracy represents humanity in the system of governance. And then you as you said that that’s what we had in India because there was knowledge at the top and at the bottom. Whether it is like epics like Rama being rendered in vernacular languages, or even knowledge base, working knowledge of astronomy, and other meteorology and other things, it was there with the experts and the common people. So, this democratization of knowledge which can say which one said represents power, this was there in various fields systems of governance, but also they were distributed. So, every village was self-sufficient, and every village had its even within the village, each community, they had their own hierarchy. They had their own hierarchy, and people could rise and succeed and get their own sense of identity there. So, the king there was capitalism in the sense that the Kings had power, but the King’s power was not making laws which apply for everyone but preserving laws which were defined by different people according to their particular local systems or local customs. So, we had, we could say almost the left values at the bottom level and right values at the top level. And the idea of taking individual responsibility. The beautiful point, you said that our limitations are temporary, but our potentials are our own, they’re lasting, because at the core, we are souls. So, with this understanding, there is the assertion of the individual. the dignity of the individual was also part of not just something that came with Judeo Christian tradition, but it was there in our tradition also and that’s how we have been great saintly people were targeted, victimized, and they didn’t expect some rescuer to come but they withstood it and they themselves rose to glory. And whenever there was because power was decentralized, whenever there was a winner, there was abuse of power. Also, it was more of an individual abusing power, rather than a whole system, exploiting someone. And that’s why we have the works of the persecuted saints also available as a legacy today, it’s not wiped out. We discuss elaborately about the caste system. So, the caste system is perceived as discriminatory, but within each caste also people had their dignity. And like you said that Guha was a king, although he was in one sense an outcast, and Nand Maharaj was a King. So, Manu says that everyone should be independent, and people had their respect. So, to some extent, the imposition of an external definition of success leads to the perception the caste system was very discriminatory, but the caste system gave autonomy for people to succeed along different channels. And to the extent there is discrimination we discussed especially against those who are handling, say human excreta. So that was unfortunate. But even that was not to that great extent, because the systems [...]

Post Image

The Monk's Podcast 68 with Radhika Raman Prabhu - Harmonizing faith and reason in bhakti - The Spiritual Scientist

Podcast http://www.thespiritualscientist.com/audio/ccd%20classes/desiretree/2020%20classes/09-20%20classes/The%20Monk%27s%20Podcast%2068%20with%20Radhika%20Raman%20Prabhu%20-%20Harmonizing%20faith%20and%20reason%20in%20bhakti.mp3 Podcast Summary http://www.thespiritualscientist.com/audio/ccd%20classes/desiretree/2020%20classes/09-20%20classes/The%20Monk%27s%20Podcast%2068%20with%20Radhika%20Raman%20Prabhu%20summmay%20-%20Harmonizing%20faith%20and%20reason%20in%20bhakti.mp3 Video: Transcription : Harmonizing faith and reason in bhakti – The Monk’s Podcast with Radhika Raman Prabhu Summary from 2:39:42 Chaitanya Charan Prabhu: So we discussed today you could say broadly on the topic of faith and reason, in devotion, in bhakti. In started with your experience. You had education, home-schooling, but that was protection, not isolation. And so you develop critical thinking at that time itself. And it was not a big culture shock or intellectual shock when you entered into academia. The “us and them”, mentality comes primarily when we don’t interact with people, except to say, speak down to them. Or so we, we can see our faith is special, but at the same time, respect other people’s faith also be seeing that there are different ways to approach Krishna. And then within the faith and reason dialogue in the academic world. I think two main themes we discussed were the historicity and the principle of Revelation. So historicity- it was very beautiful. Before answering a question, we need to question the question that why this question is important, and in the Abrahamic traditions, because they have a linear conception of history. So history is going somewhere. And that’s why where what happened, when what happened and how becomes important. But in our tradition, history is not going anywhere, the soul is going somewhere. So the historical events promote the souls evolution; is more important than the specific history or geography of those events itself. So, we discussed Srila Prabhupada’s quote about not denying that Ahobilam is where Narsimha appeared, but not insisting on it. It’s not we are not historical or non-historical, but history is simply like a departure point for us to go to the transhistorical. So, for us, if we start giving an exam that we are not prepared for, then we will get into trouble. Do we want to do that exam also? What is central for us is not the specific history. So, it is like a pyramid. One is to say a little history is itself important and this is how it is whatever the tradition says. The other is that Oh! it doesn’t matter at all. It’s what we taught is more important, it is all mythology. So, we understand its history, but the more than history is what is critical for us. What is the trans historical that is taught, that’s what we focus on. And even in the historical like say, we say Krishna appeared here in Vrindavana, it’s not the literal geography of Rādhā Kunda, but Radha Kunda as it is seen in the pratyaksha, Vidusha , that is what is important for us. So historical question, if we want to change the frame of the discussion, you discussed earlier to go inside and there is a lot of area for going into the, into the academic world. And then like Sarvabhauma Bhattacharya spoke for seven days to Chaitanya Mahaprabhu and then Chaitanya Mahaprabhu got to speak. So, some devotees who have [...]

Post Image

The Monk's Podcast 56 with Bhakti Vasudeva Maharaj - Taking bhakti wisdom into the management world - The Spiritual Scientist

Podcast http://www.thespiritualscientist.com/audio/ccd%20classes/desiretree/2020%20classes/08-20%20classes/The%20Monk%27s%20Podcast%2056%20with%20Bhakti%20Vasudeva%20Maharaj%20-%20Taking%20bhakti%20wisdom%20into%20the%20management%20world.mp3 Video: Transcription : Taking bhakti wisdom into the management world – The Monk’s Podcast with Bhakti Vasudeva Maharaj Summary from 1.12.33 Chaitanya Charan Prabhu: So we discussed today on the topic of taking Bhakti wisdom into the leadership ,in the management ,leadership field. You shared your journey, how it started with Bhakti Tirtha Maharaj’s instructions, and then you were able to publish like 25 papers in three years. Basically, you mentioned that, in the academic world, we need to have the language and the skills otherwise we won’t be respected. If we are able to present our wisdom in a way that addresses today’s problems, then there is a whole universe open over there,especially in qualitative research-a phenomenological approach. It’s mainly a way of understanding our texts, studying contemporary issues, and then applying for solving current specific problems. There is a big area in this field, big, big opportunity in this field, this field has not been that well explored. Even if there are devotees in that field, they’re not bringing about that dialogue between, say Bhagvada Gita and modern criminology or modern issues. And for those who want to do this kind of thing on one side, the leadership needs to be less myopic, and the devotees need to become more expert in creating space for themselves. Then finally, you talked about how ultimately to get people from that utilitarian philosophy to the transcendental, it’s going to be the relationships we develop. So, we may give impressive wisdom but we need to be accessible to people. And that relationship, by observing us, by being with us, they will want to take a Bhakti. Then they can also experience Krishna. Thank you very much for your time and your wisdom. So if any devotees are interested in this area, so can be on for guidance, can they contact you through your website? Vasudeva Maharaj: They can contact me on my phone number. You can also give them my email. My email is Bvs.bts8@gmail.com.I’m a liberal guy. I’m a liberal, Swami. They can feel free to contact me. Chaitanya Charan Prabhu: Thank you very much. It was wonderful having you on the Monk’s podcast. Thank you End of transcription.

Post Image

The Monk's Podcast 77 with Govinda Prabhu - Racism - what it is, what it isn't and how to deal with it? - The Spiritual Scientist

Podcast http://www.thespiritualscientist.com/audio/ccd%20classes/desiretree/2020%20classes/09-20%20classes/The%20Monk%27s%20Podcast%2077%20with%20Govinda%20Prabhu%20-%20Racism%20-%20what%20it%20is%2C%20what%20it%20isn%27t%20and%20how%20to%20deal%20with%20it.mp3 Podcast Summary http://www.thespiritualscientist.com/audio/ccd%20classes/desiretree/2020%20classes/09-20%20classes/The%20Monk%27s%20Podcast%2077%20with%20Govinda%20Prabhu%20Summary%20-%20Racism%20-%20what%20it%20is%2C%20what%20it%20isn%27t%20and%20how%20to%20deal%20with%20it.mp3 Video: Transcription : Racism -What it is and what it isn’t and how to deal with it Summary at 2.15.34 We discussed the topic of racism. We started by talking about how to consider belonging to a nation to be special, that could be a form of illusion. But we also said that for everybody to belong to something to say this is special is not bad it’s a matter of gratitude. But the thing that I’m superior, that’s what makes it bad. And then, you talked about how spirituality is meant to elevate our consciousness, but also to expand our consciousness. And if, if there is no expansion, there’s only elevation, then it is good if somebody is doing solitary bhajan. But if somebody is actually living in society. Then they will alienate people. Then we talk about Chaitanya Mahaprabhu, He was also conscious of Shankar Pandit and Shrikant, although he was in high ecstasy. So, the expansion of consciousness is there. That means we recognise and we embrace people from various backgrounds. So that expansion itself will at one level counter racism. Then we talked about how rather than focusing on racism, we focused on the idea of group identity. It could be nationalism; it could be gender group. It could be regional groups. So, at four levels we have equality and identity and be everybody’s soul, but different people have different abilities, and everybody can be given equal opportunity, but we can’t mandate equal results. So, in the example of a cricket coach, if they have a quota system then they will not have the best team. So, equality of opportunity has to be given. Then we discuss that at an individual level, acknowledging that different people are different abilities is straightforward; it’s a fact of life. But could some groups of people have certain abilities more and certain abilities less? That’s also possible. So, we could go to two extremes. One is to impose that all groups should be equal in every way. So, you said that a Telugu athlete will be as good as a African sprint runner. It’s unlikely. And we could do a lot of social engineering and do it, but what is the point of it. Is it worth the effort? Instead of that, train them and facilitate them in growing and what they are good at. One extreme would be to absolutely equalise all races, the other is to stereotype that everybody in this race will be good in this and bad in this. Say somebody from a Telugu community is very good at athletics they should also be in the facility. You actually at the start mentioned that racism arises from individual insecurity. If I have insecurity, then I try to get a sense of strength from the group which I belong to. And then, if it is an individual thing. It can be tolerated, and it can be corrected at an individual level, but when it becomes a group thing, the whole group of people start [...]

Post Image

The Monk's Podcast 78 with Krishna Kshetra Maharaj - Churning the Bhagavatam - Dashavatara 2 - Kurma - The Spiritual Scientist

Podcast http://www.thespiritualscientist.com/audio/ccd%20classes/desiretree/2020%20classes/09-20%20classes/The%20Monk%27s%20Podcast%2078%20with%20Krishna%20Kshetra%20Maharaj%20-%20Churning%20the%20Bhagavatam%20-%20Dashavatara%202%20-%20Kurma.mp3 Podcast Summary http://www.thespiritualscientist.com/audio/ccd%20classes/desiretree/2020%20classes/09-20%20classes/The%20Monk%27s%20Podcast%2078%20with%20Krishna%20Kshetra%20Maharaj%20summary%20-%20Churning%20the%20Bhagavatam%20-%20Dashavatara%202%20-%20Kurma.mp3 Transcription : Churning the Bhagavatam – Dashavatara 2 – Kurma – The Monk’s Podcast 78 with Krishna Kshetra Maharaj Summary from 1.38.55 Chaitanya Charan Prabhu: We started with the special features of Kurmadev. We talked about how it seems that He doesn’t speak, He is a very silent avatar. And there are no prayers offered to him. And then we had a lot of discussion on the nonliteral aspects. So Kurma Dev is worshipped for stability as is recommended by Bhakti Vinode Thakur. We discussed how Srila Prabhupad while presenting Krishna Bhakti in a relevant way in a context where the Mahatma Gandhi and others were reducing it to myth or bias myth, Srila Prabhupad spoke strongly about literal understanding. Bhakti Vinode Thakur while addressing Bankim Chandra Chatterji’s attempts to bowdlerize Krishna Lila, and to present things, he, he gave people a non-literal way to understand it, but also emphasize that ultimately, it has to be an initial transcendental level. We discussed various allegories. Metaphor would be more of a particular point of parallel way. Allegory is a narrative in which certain abstract properties are personified to teach something. So Chaintanya Chandrodaya natak is an allegory. At least there are allegorical characters in that. And then with respect to the Bhagavatam’s first canto in the bull and the cow narrative there is a blurring of categories, and the emphasis is on remembering and relishing Krishna. The Acharyas don’t talk so much about whether this is allegorical or not. So, depending on historical context, certain things, which we may consider very important individuality, 100- or 200-years others may think that something else is very important. So rather than focusing on what is considered contextually important we can be more Saragrahahi- essence seeking and focus on remembering the Lord. Before that you mentioned how there are not only multiple avatars present in this, but multiple avatars are cooperating in the pastime. Then we discuss how Parshuram interacts with Ram. In the spiritual world there seems to be some awareness of at least Dwarka and Vrindavana. But whether there is interaction between the various lokas and the various devotees; that is something which we don’t have clear mention about. And then we mentioned about Mandala and Yantra. So, the Kurma being present with the churning rod above him is like a Mandela. Then we have the Mandala’s in the 1st cantoo where Nimisharanya is considered to be the center of the universe. Then we have Bhu Mandala in the 5th canto, and of course we have Rasa Mandala in the 10th canto. We also discussed the idea of a universal turtle, or the turtles all the way. In our tradition, if you consider Kurma to be the supreme Lord. Then Kashyapa is the Prajapati. So, from the Prajapati everything comes. Kurma sustains everything. So, in that sense, there is a parallel over here. You also discussed a lot in detail about how when Kurma appears, there is the churning in the 8th the 10th cantos. While, the churning in the 10th [...]

Post Image

What to do when in a relationship that we can neither tolerate nor retaliate? - The Spiritual Scientist

Answer Podcast https://www.thespiritualscientist.com/audio/CCD%20QA/2018%20QA/02-18%20QA/What%20to%20do%20when%20in%20a%20relationship%20that%20we%20can%20neither%20tolerate%20nor%20retaliate.mp3 Transcription : Transcribed by: Rakesh Garg Question: What to do when in a relationship that we can neither tolerate nor retaliate? Answer: Basically, there is no set formula for relationship. Rather than seeing a relationship as frustrating, we can see the relationship as a way for us to grow in understanding as to how to deal with people, not necessarily only with this person, but also with other persons in our life. Then even if that relationship never improves, but we grow in our understanding of how to deal with people. Basically, rather than sticking to a set formula, we can think that how can I move forward. Sometimes, we give some people too much of our mental time. That means if somebody has a scar on their body, the scar cannot go away, but if we are thinking about it all the time then it hurts even more than the scar. Similarly, in a difficult relationship if we keep thinking of that sour relationship all the time then it hurts much more. Some time we need to conceptualize the situation – okay, this is going to be difficult, I can do what I can, but I have to just move on. It is not that easy and say in general if we can find some limb of bhakti, which we can intensify, e.g. kirtan or hearing then that will give us the inner strength by which we can find out how to deal with the situation. We try to show Krishna that we want to serve him, but do not know how as nothing seems to be working and request for his guidance. Sometimes our mind still asks the question – why this person did like this to me? Sometimes this “why” has no answer. Rather than asking “why”, we should ask “how can I serve” or “how can I move ahead” in this situation. If we have this attitude, some way will emerge. Srila Prabhupada rightly said that a devotee may be perplexed, but a devotee is not discouraged. Discourage means – I do not feel like doing anything. Perplex means – I do not know what to do. To summarize, we are perplexed at times. In such situations we can just try to show Krishna our desire to serve by doing some more intense devotional activities. Then Krishna will give us the intelligence that how to move forward in this situation. End of transcription.